Kismet

Inspiring Insight

Posts tagged ‘angela duckworth’

How Children Succeed (Con’t) Featured

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It’s Sunday and that means…research update!

Page 91, Paul Tough’s book, How Children Succeed

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (or CBT) involves using the conscious mind to recognize negative or self-destructive thoughts or interpretations and to (sometimes literally), talk yourself into a better perspective.

CBT is just one example under the big umbrella of “Metacognition.” Talking about character, evaluating character are metacognitive strategies.

However, just knowing about strategies is not enough.

Gabrielle Oettingen (NYU Psychologist) says people tend to use one of three strategies when setting goals and only one is very effective:

  1. Envisioning achieving the goal – this feels so good when you do it. It feels motivating and it can trigger a dopamine surge. But studies show that just doing this is NOT sufficient.
  2. Pessimists dwell on obstacles to their goals and of course, this is ineffective.
  3. Mental Contrasting is effective – it’s kind of a combination of both: focus on the positive outcome but at the same time, acknowledge the obstacles. The necessary next step is to create a series of implementation intentions:

If/then statements – “If I get distracted from my work, then I will…”

This is setting rules for yourself.

Rules overcome drawbacks of willpower which redirects our attention from the obstacle or challenge and helps us become automatic in practicing positive behavior.

According to Duckworth: “Habits are character.”

Group identity (stereotypes) can have both positive and negative effects on achievement.

Before a challenging math test, female college students need only be reminded that they are female for them to do WORSE on the test than female students who do not receive that identity cue. (p. 96)

Telling students that intelligence is malleable has led to better academic performance.

A study of low-income 7th grade students in Texas were divided into two groups:

  1. heard a growth mindset message
  2. heard an anti-drug message

The first group performed significantly better – girls who used to lag behind boys in math closed the gap completely.

16. Report Cards

 

Dual-purpose instruction – when teachers deliberately work explicit talk about character strengths into every lesson.

Optimism, self-control, social intelligence are a few examples

“Character strengths can become character weaknesses.” For example, someone with too much grit might then be weak in empathy towards others. There is a balance that needs to be reached.

17. Climbing the Mountain p. 101

KIPP School – tracking students in college

“…it’s the character piece that has held some back (procrastination). Depression is also an issue.”

The impact of poverty catches up even with children who are resilient.

Character can function as a substitute for social net that the middle and upper class kids enjoy.

To succeed, they need more grit, social intelligence and more self-control than wealthier kids.

But KIPP students who graduate do not have just a diploma. They have the knowledge that they climbed a mountain to get it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do You Have What it Takes? Featured

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How passionate and persevering are you? Duckworth’s research shows the power of grit (courage and resolve). This is a strong indicator for success. People who score high in grit rarely quit or drop out of their pursuits.

Click here to answer the 10 questions: The Grit Questionnaire

How’d you do?

Grit is something you can work on. Duckworth believes you can use your results to reflect and increase your grit (if you want).

 

 

5 Ways to Increase Grit

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Grit – the persevering drive to achieve one’s goals – is identified as one of the most powerful factors for success, even more than talent.

A big part of my job is to preserve perseverance in my students. As a mother, modeling and maintaining grit is central to my parenting style. We can raise talented, very smart children, but without resilience, they won’t create and maintain satisfying, successful careers and lives.

Perhaps you’ve found your own passion and you can relate. “I love writing/painting/coding/etc. but I often fail to complete a project. How can I develop grit?”

Angela Duckworth, a noted psychologist, author and recipient of the MacArthur Genius award for her work on grit, identified 5 research-based ways to increase your grit level:*

  1. Pursue your interests – obviously, if you’re intrinsically driven to pursue something, you’ll be more apt to stick with it through thick and thin!
  2. Practice insanely – consistent, deliberate practice not only makes perfect, it also increases your perseverance.
  3. Find purpose – if your long-term objective is to help your community or others, you’re more likely to stick with the work than if your objective is to save up for that dream Ferrari.
  4. Be optimistic, have hope – truly believe and expect that tomorrow will be better than today. So if you’re still learning and making mistakes, know that you’re just going to get better and better.
  5. Join a Gritty Group – Have you heard the saying, “You’re the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with?” It’s true. Stick with diligent people and you’ll be persevering too.

 

 

*Source:  http://theweek.com/articles/624204/5-researchbacked-ways-increase-grit