Podcast for Artists and Consultants

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I’ve been following Seth Godin’s work for many years. He just gets better and better. This podcast episode got me jazzed. If you’re considering freelancing or being an entrepreneur (or if you believe they are synonyms(!)) this podcast is for you:

“Freelancers”

Here are notes from the podcast:

First of all, entrepreneurs are people who start companies, make money while they sleep and employ people. Freelancers actually create the work and usually work alone (might shop out aspects of their work, but mostly do it themselves). When he said this, I realized I am definitely not an entrepreneur! But being a freelancer resonated with me when it comes to my personality and goals.

Choose an industry that is glad to see you arrive.

Possess hard-earned skills.  You can charge a lot, but deliver more than what people pay for. 

Focus on the smallest viable audience – not a large one [This is the opposite of what so many failed businesses do!]. As a freelancer, you can only handle so much. This small group of people (your customers) will talk about you and wait in line for you.

Commit to the discipline of prospecting – you need to do your work and spend time getting work (building your business). Dedicate some time every day to honing your skills, finding new tools, spreading the word, earning the privilege of working for others (NOT networking parties).

Godin uses an example: He knows a photographer who shoots in a specific location at specific times and only those for clients. She

What gets you picked is you being in the Category of One. No one can substitute you. Get beyond being One of Many. Do quirky, unique, exceptional work – work that sounds like you, looks like you….the work that most people do not like. (Are you trying too hard to be liked by everyone?)

True Wealth

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My sister gifted this book to me for my birthday, along with a magnifying mirror:

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Thus, I’m becoming knowledgeable about microcredit and I have a freshly tweezed face.

I’m only on page 28, but this is what I’ve learned thus far:

Mr. Yunus has been involved with working for the benefit of poor people in India for most of his life. He is now 77. Through his work, he has enabled the poorest of the poor to gain credit, become entrepreneurs and thus, productive members of society.

The American economic system works in the favor of the rich. This is plainly obvious. Our banks do not believe in our poor. We believe that given credit, the poor will never pay the debt back. However, Yunus says his experience is the opposite: his Grameen Bank “lends over $2.5billion in U.S. currency a year to 9 million poor women on the basis of trust only.” The repayment rate? 98.96%!

Grameen Bank has 19 branches in the U.S. with “86,000 borrowers, all women*, who receive business startup loans averaging around $1,000. As of 2017, the loans disbursed…total over $600 million, and the repayment rate is over 99%.”

Yunus believes our emphasis on GDP is inaccurate and incomplete. We are not taking account the “Whole Person” in our economy. Our focus is on the selfish and our system is based on rewarding the selfish. So what do we get? Corruption, inflation and more and more people in poverty.

This man’s work is proof that it only takes one person to make an enormous difference globally. The secret? See a need, work to fulfill that need to help others and do not focus on fame or wealth. (Never mind that Yunus has a net worth of $10million and he won the Nobel Peace Prize!)

 

*You might wonder why Yunus is loaning money to women: He wanted to help the poorest of the poor.

 

Podcasts & Productivity

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Photo by Jonathan Velasquez

A year ago,  I read the book “The $100 Startup.”

I hardly remembered what I read, but I recently listened to a podcast (Optimal Living Daily) where the podcaster reviewed this book. The big takeaway (among many) is that people spend an awful lot of time trying to blaze their own trails to success when they can simply follow someone who has already achieved what they want.

The reasoning, Justin (podcast host) believes, is because it feels good to try to create our own means and methods. But if you really want to achieve your goal(s), the most efficient way is to simply follow what someone already did.

This makes sense! Why reinvent the wheel?

We feel good and effective as we blaze our own trail, because we feel so busy.

But do not confuse “busy” with “productive.”

Check the podcast out, he covers many great writers and entrepreneurs. Justin’s voice is very even and mellow. It was easy to listen to as I walked my dog.