Mary Oliver*

Mary Oliver
Mary Oliver and her dog

Wild Geese

Mary Oliver1935 – 2019

Wild Geese

 

Oliver, who cited Walt Whitman as an influence, is best known for her awe-filled, often hopeful, reflections on and observations of nature. “Mary Oliver’s poetry is an excellent antidote for the excesses of civilization,” wrote one reviewer for the Harvard Review, “for too much flurry and inattention, and the baroque conventions of our social and professional lives. She is a poet of wisdom and generosity whose vision allows us to look intimately at a world not of our making.”

Her honors include an American Academy of Arts & Letters Award, a Lannan Literary Award, the Poetry Society of America’s Shelley Memorial Prize and Alice Fay di Castagnola Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Oliver held the Catharine Osgood Foster Chair for Distinguished Teaching at Bennington College until 2001. She lived for over forty years in Provincetown, Massachusetts, with her partner Molly Malone Cook, a photographer and gallery owner. After Cook’s death in 2005, Oliver later moved to the southeastern coast of Florida. Oliver died of cancer at the age of eighty-three in Hobe Sound, Florida, on January 17, 2019.

*This contents of this post come from Poets.org

Mary Oliver reminds me to look to nature whenever I feel humans are letting the world down. Rejoice in the strength of the trees and the persistent bloom of flowers.

-CCW

 

 

 

A Shot in the Arm

kate-remmer-203254.jpg
Photo by Katie Remmer

Y is for Yet*

 

I love the word “yet”                                                                  It’s full of promise and optimism

I haven’t learned Python …

I haven’t published my second book…

I haven’t been to England…

I’m not very good at illustrating…

I haven’t produced a short film…

I haven’t been to Korea with my kids…

yet! And until I do, I will enjoy every delicious moment of this great journey.

 

*Part of my alphabiography series

Riddle Me This

 

R is for Ridiculous

 

Here’s a shiny new bowl,

with crushed ice and filtered water

She snubs it – actually walks away –

and seeks water from the murky plant bowl

that captures rainwater,

soil and dead plant parts

daft dog!

dog with water

 

 

 

 

Digression

 

Q is for Quiet*

If I could say anything to my students, I’d say:

“Hi, my name is Mrs. Wyatt and I like it very quiet.”

But alas, my last name is Wipff

(origin: Alsace-Lorraine) Yes, Swiss

I chose this name! I married it.

My surname is Chung but not Chinese, Korean

It is pronounced “Jung” – not “yung” like Carl (who was Swiss, by the way)

 

What’s that you say?

Oh yes, I love the Quiet

IMG-0403

 

 

*Part of my alphabiography series

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bookish

katya-austin-313223.jpg
Photo from Katya Austin

M is for Moving*

 

My daughter brings books from school

Sherman Alexie and John Cheever

mesmerizing, momentous and magnificent

Indigenous American meets Chekhov of the Suburbs

stories of the malcontents,

the maniacs and the maculate

This teen is spellbound

macrocosms beyond her self now revealed

like I was, when I first split a book in two

 

*part of my alphabiography series