Student Reflection #1

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I’ve had a record number of late work assignments turned in this year. For each assignment submitted late, I’m having students complete this form. Something tells me this will not be the only form this student submits this year…

It’s How You do What You do

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Plush Design Studio

I asked my 12-year-old niece, “Who is your favorite teacher?”  Although math comes most easily to her, she didn’t hesitate to tell me her English teacher is her favorite instructor of all time, because “She is so enthusiastic about everything! She loves to act stories out.”

Here’s to enthusiasm!

Teacher Retention*

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“Public School Teacher Attrition and Mobility in the First Five Years,” found that 10 percent of new teachers in 2007-08 didn’t return the following year, increasing cumulatively to 12 percent in year three, 15 percent in year four and 17 percent in the fifth year. The totals include teachers who were let go and subsequently didn’t find a job teaching in another district.

“Two important findings support what NEA has advocated for a long time. That high-quality mentors and competitive salaries make a difference in keeping teachers,” said Segun Eubanks, director for Teacher Quality at the National Education Association.

 

Data from edsource.org

 

Tired of Starting Over?

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Today’s motto (for me) is “just do it.”

 

I’m in the middle of the National Board of Certification process and one requirement is to take two 15-minute videos of myself teaching and to analyze them. In order to do this, I must view the videos. Repeatedly.

Ugh.

I do not like to hear myself – alone see myself – on screen.

At last, I did it. And you know what? It wasn’t terrible.

So, today, I encourage you to “just do it.” If it needs to be done, but you dread it, know that it’s OK.

If you need a more aggressive motivational message, watch Shia below:

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What is School for?

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I’m a teacher and I’m usually loathe to listen to any non-teacher who criticizes education. However, Seth Godin is a teacher in his own right and what he has to say makes perfect sense.

Godin published an education manifesto and I think everyone should read it. It’s made a deep impression on me and I’ve made immediate changes to my teaching. Rote memory is ridiculous. Deducting points off for trivial things is dumb. Let’s teach students how to learn and then CREATE things and take ACTION!

Please, read some of his manifesto or watch his podcast (Stop Stealing Dreams) if you care about education.

Just because it’s hard to make change doesn’t mean we should give up.