money, motivation, Personal Success, relationships

Something New

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If you want something different, do something different.

Now.

Don’t wait.

No excuses.

Take baby steps if you need to, but do it.

By the way, you’ll have to make a sacrifice or two.  You’ll probably be a little uncomfortable. This is why most people don’t reach their goals: They don’t want discomfort and they don’t want to give anything up.

Will you stand out?

 

poetry, writing

Wherever You Go

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Photo by Steve Richey

G is for Geography

Davenport, Iowa

my childhood: pizza and friends, rollerskating rinks and birthday parties, and

Tae Kwon Do

DeKalb, Illinois

my high school years, academic stress, Madonna and Prince, cornfields, detassling, Del Monte factory

Rochester, New York

holy-crap-cold, ice storms, tunnel systems, hibernation, isolation, spring, independence

San Francisco, California

Real freedom (!), real work, KKSF Radio, banking, teaching, marriage, babies, house, traffic

Mesa, Arizona

Culture shock, new home, dry heat, sweet violin music, educating, new friends, cancer, husband’s lay offs, writing, and stillness

 

 

*part of alphabiography series
Health, motivation

Laziness #3: Pema Chodron

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by Jason Rosewell

Chodron’s third kind of harmful laziness  is the “Couldn’t Care Less” form. This is a harder, tougher version of “Loss of Heart.” For in this type of apathy, we are hardened and angry at the world. We are “aggressive and defiant.” If someone tries to cheer us up, we lash out at them. We use “laziness as a way of getting revenge.” But really, we hurt ourselves the most.

Until we decide to investigate and objectively look at our intentions, we will continue this destructive pattern. We will continue to have our “problems”: health, relationships and career.

It’s simple, but not necessarily easy. Sometimes, we don’t want to “get real.” We are comfortable in our habitual patterns of laziness. But the benefits of doing the work will greatly outweigh any temporary comfort.

 

 

 

 

motivation, Personal Success

Are You Chicken Little or the Road Runner?

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Luis Llerena

When I worked at a startup company years ago and things got stressful, my supervisor would wail, “We’re just set up to fail!” She cried real tears once, when it looked like we were going to miss delivering our McDonald’s Kids’ Meal prize on time.

The deadlines were tight and stringent. “We’re set up to fail!”

There was a bug in the system. “We’re set up to fail!”

The art department misunderstood the engineering department. “We’re set up to fail!”

In actuality, she meant, “I’m afraid we’re going to fail!”

In the end, the entire startup did fail. But our department never did, we simply met our goals with a lot of stress. The constant cry of the “sky is falling” unnerved the team. Projects that could have been accomplished with fun and enjoyment were, instead, completed in solemn urgency.

Isn’t this what many people do at work and life? Aren’t a lot of people motivated by fear? Fear of failure, fear of losing money, fear of losing face.

People can be motivated by fun and awe and still get it done.

 

 

 

Personal Success

If You Build It, They Will Come

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Our daughter played in a symphonic concert tonight. She’s almost 14 and is very active in several orchestras at the moment. The symphonic group she played in tonight celebrated their 50th anniversary this year.  This group is a district group, including all the kids in the city who audition and make it. The kids then come to three different rehearsals of 2 hours each. They perform in the local Ikeda Theater for parents and friends. Admission is free.

Wayne Roederer started this program 50 years ago. He has conducted and started many programs and just retired two years ago. He conducted one of the groups and spoke to the parents, his voice breaking with emotion. “It was a joyous experience for me,” he said, “to work with your children. It was well worth missing Judge Judy for several days.”  We all laughed.

The kids played with pride. They moved to the music.

Afterwards, we spoke with him. We congratulated him and told him how we appreciate his work. He said that he has worked with children who grew up to be adults who started orchestra programs of their own and now those kids have grown and are starting programs…

What might appear to be his legacy at first glance: the kids he worked with directly…is much more than that. This man has literally influenced thousands of people.

One man. An idea. And many helpful hands, parent volunteers and eager students. That’s all it took.

You are one person. You have an idea. Start building it…people will help you.

 

 

Health, motivation

Can Work Be Joyful?

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“I don’t know what I’m passionate about! How do I find my passion?”

How about starting with a list of things you would do for free? Make a list. Don’t censor yourself.

You can also try to remember what you enjoyed doing when you were eight years old. Add those activities. Nothing is too silly.

I’d love to hear what you come up with. How can you incorporate this into your work?