Goodbye, Things

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The absence of “things” can bring great peace and actually buy you time and energy. As the author of Goodbye, Things says,

“To let go is not to lose but to gain. When you let go, something new will inevitably come and fill in the empty space you created.”

-Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye Things

Minimalist Traveling

alex-holyoake-157978My 13 year old daughter and I are leaving tonight for a week in D.C. I’m still practicing “simplistic living” (subtract, subtract, subtract (!)) and my goal is to pack as little as possible.

 

I’m not checking a bag and everything fits in two my carry on bags. A small, nagging voice is wondering if I have everything I need, but I know I do. With little to worry about, we’re ready for a great time!

 

The Simplicity Experiment

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Confession: Once in awhile, I fantasize about selling EVERYTHING I own and taking just the essentials in a backpack and trekking across country.

Reality: I’m a mom of two teenage girls and a 6 year old dog. I’m also a wife and a teacher. I have too many responsibilities. But I’ve always been a fan of simplicity and this year, as I approach 50, I’m more determined than ever to pare down every part of my life to the bare esssentials. Why? Because – and I’m speaking for just myself here – I believe living a minimalistic life is a path to true happiness.

Biggest Challenge: I have a family. I can’t – and won’t – get rid of their things.

Method: I’m a fan of slow. Slow and sure. Every weekend, I fill a bag or two of things to donate. I’m careful with grocery shopping. I freeze excess and rarely throw anything away. I’ve been purchasing books on Kindle and in thrift stores. My bookshelves contain only the books I am passionate about.

Whenever I download “stuff,” I feel so light and free!